Photo Friday

Every Friday Echo runs images from the Great Lakes region that are mostly submitted by readers. Submit one to GreatLakesEcho@gmail.com. Include your name, a brief description of the image, when it was taken and any unusual circumstances involved in taking it.

Recent Stories

Photo Friday: Tire trash

Trash along a pedestrian walkway in Bridgeport, Mich. Image: Diana Popp Rossiter

Diana Popp Rossiter took this image in early June during a walk through Lyle Park in Bridgeport Township, about six miles southeast of  Saginaw. The pedestrian trail starts at a restored historic bridge across the Cass River in downtown Bridgeport and extends through Lyle Park which runs along side the Cass River. “Running alongside the trail is a railroad track and between the tracks and trail is a low area of land,” Popp Rossiter writes. “That low area of land is filled with trash that has been dumped by polluters over the years and also trash that gets deposited there every year by the flood waters. “This trash includes seven tires that are usually sitting there with water in them serving as a mosquito breeding source.” Continue Reading →

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Photo Friday: Map turtle

This map turtle made an appearance in a garden in Williamston, Mich. Image: Dan Slider

 

Here’s what Great Lakes Echo reader Dan Slider has to say about capturing this image in late May:

Our backyard slopes down to the Red Cedar River in Williamston (Mich.)  When our border terrier mix, Roari, and I started our usual evening stroll, we heard something rustling in the garden bed behind us and discovered this beautiful turtle with a glossy green shell.  The terrier kept a curious eye on the turtle while I ran back into the house for my camera.  My wife looked up Michigan turtles online and identified it as a map turtle. A week later, a neighbor knocked on my door to tell me there was a large turtle laying eggs by the curb down the street.   He wondered if it could be the same turtle I had seen. Continue Reading →

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Got art? We need it.

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You might be aware of Great Lakes Echo’s end-of-the-week series, “Photo Friday.” We want your help to make it better! Each week, we post a picture of an environmental scene or event. It can be anything from the sky to the dirt and anything in between. Sometimes these photos come from us, sometimes they come from organizations, and sometimes they come from our readers. The one you see on this story was taken by Tim Trombley up in Lake Superior. Continue Reading →

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Photo Friday: Kitch-iti-kipi spring

Big Spring, Manistique, Mich. Image: Peggy Riemer.

Lake, brown and brook trout are found in the 45 degree Kitch-iti-kipi spring at Palms Book State Park in Manistique, Mich. The water moves through porous sandstone and is discharged into a pond at 10,000 gallons a minute. Visitors can watch the roiling of the clean sands some 40 feet below from a viewing raft. “It’s a fascinating ever-changing floor,” said Peggy Riemer, who captured these images last October. She recently posted similar images and information on NASA’s Earth Science Picture of the Day. Continue Reading →

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Photo Friday: Educational cruise

Students at the Leelenau School enjoy a chilly spring day aboard an Inland Seas Education Center vessel.

The Leelanau School – an experiential boarding high school for kids with learning differences in Glen Arbor, Mich. – braved the spring chill on a field trip with the Inland Seas Education Center. Inland Seas is a Suttons Bay, Mich.,  non-profit organization that helps people of all ages experience the science and spirit of the Great Lakes through hands-on learning aboard a traditionally rigged tall ship schooner.  Image: Inland Seas Education Center. Have a photo to submit for our Photo Friday series? Send it to us on Facebook or Twitter, or in an email to greatlakesecho@gmail.com. Continue Reading →

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Photo Friday: Satellite view of ice melting on Lake Baikal

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Russia’s Lake Baikal is the deepest lake in the world and holds more freshwater than all of the North American Great Lakes. This shot featured on NASA’s Earth Observatory was taken from the International Space Station on April 22. Much of the lake is covered with ice. The brightest point reflects the sun from where the ice has begun to melt, according to NASA.   Continue Reading →

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Photo Friday: Manitowoc Breakwater Lighthouse

The sun rises over Manitowoc, Wisc. (Photo: Catherine Egger)

This picture of a perfectly clear sunrise over Lake Michigan was taken by Catherine Egger in Manitowoc, Wisc. during the summer of 2013. The city of Manitowoc is about 40 miles southeast of Green Bay, and the lighthouse in the distance is the Manitowac Breakwater Lighthouse, which has been a part of the shoreline for over 100 years. Have a photo to submit for our Photo Friday series? Send it to us on Facebook or Twitter, or in an email to greatlakesecho@gmail.com. Continue Reading →

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Photo Friday: Historic observation tower in Michigan City, Ind.

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These photos of a 77-year-old observation tower in Michigan City, Ind. were taken by Echo reader and Montana resident Kathleen Stachowski last year during warmer times. Growing up in Indiana, she said one of her favorite childhood memories was making the 220-step trek to the top with her mother. The tower was designed by Fred Ahlgrim in the 1930s, according to Michigan City’s website. The 70-foot-tall Art Deco-inspired building is built of limestone and is located right next to the Washington Park Zoo on the Lake Michigan lakefront. Continue Reading →

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Photo Friday: Michigan ice skirts

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These photos taken by Ken Scott on April 14 show ice skirts formed near the bottom of trees and shrubs in northern Michigan. The images are posted on the Earth Science Picture of the Day feature produced by NASA’s Earth Sciences Division. This phenomenon was caused by heavy springtime rain falling on top of several inches of snow. As the water receded, temperatures in the area plunged – causing top layer of water (also the coldest layer) to freeze while the layers below the surface were more insulated and melted away. Have you ever seen an ice skirt before? Continue Reading →

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