Study finds climate change may worsen allergies

Findings by researchers at the University of Michigan predict that warming temperatures may result in increased seasonal allergies. They also found that pollen emissions could begin 40 days earlier than normal, with allergy season lasting an additional 19 days. That’s in contrast with a normal allergy season that typically lasts 10 to 30 days. 

Finding home in our own bodies can rekindle connection to nature

For decades, people have largely ignored the Earth’s decay, treating climate change as a problem that can be postponed. Ranae Lenor Hanson, a retired professor and activist, rejects that fallacy and defends the Earth, its waters and all its creatures in her book Watershed: Attending to a Body and Earth in Distress.

From sinks to sources: peatland carbon is poised to be part of the climate crisis

In the Marcell Experimental Forest in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, there are no trails for hiking, grounds for camping nor lakes for boating. Instead, there are temperature-manipulating chambers and field laboratories. Marcell was chosen to study because of its peatlands, a unique landscape that occupies just 3%  of the earth’s surface, yet stores 30% of soil carbon.

Climate change increases milk production

Researchers found that increasing temperatures from climate change may slightly increase milk production, despite the heat stress on cows. The loss of milk production through heat stress is offset by the increase in feed production.

Commentary: Blueberries, climate and loss of community

In the last few decades, fluctuating temperatures in the late winter or early spring have harmed blueberry production across the state. More of that kind of trouble – and more often – may be in store for the state’s fruit-growers.