Water quantity

Recent Stories

Month in review: Carp and Waukesha

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At the end of each month, we check in with Echo commentator Gary Wilson for updates on environmental stories from around the Basin. Click on the audio clip above for today’s Great Lakes Month in Review which discusses efforts to keep Asian carp and Waukesha, Wis.,  out of Lake Michigan. This segment is produced as part of a partnership with  WKAR’s Current State public affairs program. More radio news about the Great Lakes environment can be found on Current State every Tuesday as part of our partnership. Continue Reading →

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Congress expands Great Lakes dredging

A summer's day in Grand Haven on the beach and in the water. Image: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District.

 
Everybody knows water flows, but not many people know that the sediment below it does too. That’ s why harbors need dredging, or excavating the gradually accumulated material at the bottom of the water and transporting it elsewhere. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District had planned eight dredging projects in Michigan and Wisconsin for 2014 worth $13.2 million. But Congress recently allocated an additional $17.8 million. That allows the district to include eight new projects and increase funding for four of the original projects. Continue Reading →

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Even water rich Great Lakes residents must adapt to climate change

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According to a new report by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, 40 percent of the world’s population will live under severe water stress by 2050. While the Great Lakes region is water rich, the report suggest that even water wealthy areas should work toward adaptive policies to secure freshwater’s future. Continue Reading →

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Weighing environmental, economic impacts of dredging

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Dredging by EmanueleB

This year record low water levels have spurred the Michigan government to spend over $20 million on dredging. Many hope dredging will enable recreational and commercial boating to continue, preventing revenue loss. However, the plan could still cost Michiganders. Dredging can stir up contaminated sediments, causing environmental and health issues. Michael Alexander works for the Department of Environmental Quality’s Water Resources Division. Continue Reading →

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