New report outlines attitudes on Michigan’s energy future

Current State logoNew report outlines attitudes on Michigan’s energy future by Great Lakes Echo

In 2008,  the state legislature passed Michigan’s Renewable Portfolio Standard. The law requires that by the year 2015,  utilities must generate at least 10 percent of their energy from renewable sources.  As 2015 approaches, state officials are working to determine the next steps for Michigan’s energy policy.

Earlier this year we spoke with Michigan Public Service Commission Chair John Quakenbush. At the time he was holding public forums on the state’s energy future. The information compiled at the forums and online are part of four comprehensive draft reports.

  • Dave

    The success of any effectual renewable-energy program will certainly hinge on upgrading (or completely rebuilding) our energy grid. The current grid is almost completely reliant upon a centralized “burn-it-as-needed-to-generate-it-when-called-for” model, which is not sustainable.

    A total redesign of our power grid to embrace distributed production and storage would allow our nation to move forward from the current impasse that current technology has us locked into. While there would be a significant investment required to make this happen, the vast portion of that cost would redound to local manufacturing and jobs necessary to create a 21st-Century infrastructure. Communities would benefit significantly from the increased economic activity from quality jobs. Once the grid was in place, there would also be a continuing economic payback for all consumers of energy (i.e. every single person in our country who is not totally “off the grid”).

    The major barrier is that of “manufactured crisis” courtesy of the purveyors of fossil-fueled power and who have too many billions of dollars to spend fighting the change to renewables, and bought-and-paid-for politicians who must rely on contributions to keep their jobs.